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WellnessShould You Really Be Drinking V8 Juice?

Should You Really Be Drinking V8 Juice?

V8 is a popular vegetable juice that claims to provide 2 servings of vegetables in an 8-ounce glass.

Any 100 percent vegetable juice counts toward a person’s daily recommended vegetable intake.

However, due to the importance of fiber, many nutritionists recommend eating whole vegetables and fruits. V8 may also contribute to a person’s salt intake.

With these guidelines in mind, how healthful is V8?

Possible health benefits

The makers of V8 claim that it is an excellent source of vitamins A and C. Additionally, it contains no artificial colors or flavors, and no preservatives.

About 90 percent of “original” V8 juice is tomato puree. The product also contains:

  • carrot juice
  • celery juice
  • beet juice
  • parsley juice
  • lettuce juice
  • watercress juice
  • spinach juice
  • salt
  • citric acid
  • natural flavors

Also, V8 contains the following nutrients per 100 milliliters:

Carbohydrates 3.75 g
Sugars 2.92 g
Fiber 0.4 g
Protein 0.83 g
Calcium 12.0 mg
Sodium 267.0 mg

Below is more information about the purported health benefits of V8.

Vitamin A

According to the Campbell’s website, 8 ounces (oz) of original V8 can supply 40 percent of a person’s daily vitamin A requirement.

An 8-oz glass of V8 provides 1,999 international units (IU) of vitamin A. Although the juice is a good source of the vitamin, many whole foods are better.

For example, half a cup of carrots provides 9,189 IU, or 184 percent of a person’s daily vitamin A requirement.

Other foods rich in vitamin A include:

  • pumpkins
  • sweet potatoes
  • spinach
  • cantaloupes
  • peppers

Vitamin C

An 8-oz glass of V8 has 150 percent of a person’s daily vitamin C requirement, according to Campbell’s website.

However, all juices go through a pasteurization process, which involves heat. This heat treatment destroys some of the vitamin C.

The following whole foods are good sources of vitamin C:

  • red peppers
  • oranges and orange juice
  • kiwis
  • grapefruits
  • cooked broccoli

source: medicalnewstoday.com


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